Goodbye digital, hello paper

February 3rd, 2017 by Bob Bly

In an article in The New York Review of Books (2/9/2017), Bill
McKibben notes that an increasing number of folks are turning
away from electronic communication and instead choosing
old-school media.

For instance:

>> In 2006, just 900,000 new vinyl records were sold in the U.S.
In 2015, the number of vinyl records sold was 23 million — an
increase of 20% per year.

>> Despite a hefty $150 price for an annual subscription, in the
last decade the magazine The Economist has seen its print
circulation grow by 600,000.

>> Students who take massive open online courses (MOOCs) perform
worse, and learn less, than their peers who are sitting in a
school listening to a teacher talking in front of a blackboard.

>> In many classrooms and office conference rooms, schools and
corporations are replacing digital smartboards with paper and
colored markers.

>> Hundreds of board game parlors, where people get together to
play on game boards made of cardboard moving pieces made of
plastic or metal, have opened in North America.

So … what are the reasons a portion of the population is turning
back to old media?

>> Well, in the case of records, people enjoy handling and
playing them, and appreciate the cover art and liner notes. They
also gain a sense of ownership over the music some don’t get from
digital.

>> For The Economist, when you carry the print edition, people
can see what you are reading, which if the magazine is
prestigious, shows you are smart, cultured, and in-the-know. Much
harder to see that the bloke next to you is reading the digital edition of The Economist without sticking your face right in front of his smart phone.

>> MOOCs does not surprise me. Podcasts, online courses,
streaming video, and other digital classes simply cannot match
the interaction and personalized attention a teacher gives in a
classroom or a speaker like me gives at a live workshop.

>> As for video games vs. board games, McKibben quotes writer David Sax: “Even if you were playing World of Warcraft with the same group of friends around the world each day, talking smack over
your headsets, and typing in snippets of conversation, you were
ultimately alone in a room with a screen, and the loneliness
washed over you like a wave when the game ended.”

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This entry was posted on Friday, February 3rd, 2017 at 11:06 am and is filed under Direct Marketing, Online Marketing. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

4 responses about “Goodbye digital, hello paper”

  1. iphone 6 plus skins said:

    good article i also go for the old school media prefer book not ebook

  2. personalized gifts online in india said:

    Good article but if we goes with the old school method it has its pros.and cons also

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  3. Erin Osborne said:

    I presume you are doing all of your presentation in powerpoint. So, getting the information together is not the trouble.So, between now and then, you need http://www.assignmenthelpdeal.co.uk/ to get get admission to to a smartboard and digital projector that has a pc attached to it that has smartboard software installed. Then you need a person to expose you a way to ‘orient’ the board so that the board knows where you’re when you tap at the board. You need to run via a presentation before hand so you do not have that stess on presentation day.

  4. Daniel Bibby said:

    Thanks for sharing experiences with us; I am in the favor of old school media. As I strongly agree with the point that the electronic methods can be more expensive than paper. http://ukleaflets.co.uk/

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