Opposing Philosophies on Viral E-Book Marketing

July 22nd, 2008 by Bob Bly

I have the greatest respect and admiration for David Meerman Scott.

But the advice he gives on his www.webinknow.com blog on viral e-book marketing is diametrically opposed to mine.

David advises: “Make the content totally free with no registration requirement at all so people are more likely to download it and share with colleagues.”

As a result, his latest free viral e-book was downloaded 250,000 times.

I advise my readers to require the user to submit his e-mail address … and opt into my e-list … in exchange for getting my free viral e-books like my latest on selling to the “GOM” market — men age 50 and older.

You can see the landing page — and get the free report — at www.marketing2goms.com.

I understand David’s thinking: he wants his e-book, name, and ideas to spread as quickly and widely online as they can.

I don’t care about that: my purpose is to build a large opt-in e-list of qualified prospects for my paid information products.

Why? Because with an e-list, I can consistently and reliably monetize my online promotions — and measure the results to the penny in real time.

If you are an Internet marketing entrepreneur, your e-list is your most valuable asset — the key to building a successful online business.

Everything you do should be aimed at either making a sale or getting the visitor to opt into your e-list.

Obviously in David’s world — mainly corporate B2B marcom — the goals are quite different, though I am not fully convinced they should be.

What about you? Do you currently give away free content online as part of a viral marketing campaign (if not, you probably should)?

Do you let people download it without capturing their e-mail addresses, as David does — or use free content offers to build a large and profitable e-list, like I have?

Does David know something I don’t? Or vice versa?

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This entry was posted on Tuesday, July 22nd, 2008 at 12:49 pm and is filed under General. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

45 responses about “Opposing Philosophies on Viral E-Book Marketing”

  1. Joel Heffner said:

    David’s primary source of income is public speaking. As such, his ebooks are really his business cards that he wants as many folks to see and talk about as possible.

  2. Michael A. Stelzner said:

    Hey Bob;

    David is a friend. We have different views on this.

    Here’s how I explain it.

    David is not about lead generation. He is about PR.

    Thus, he cares more about branding and creating awareness than he does necessarily feeding the sales funnel.

    I saw him speak in Boston this year. And it’s really a message about viral communication.

    Because his purpose is different, his message is as well.

    Mike

  3. James said:

    Bob,

    I think that David is generating leads… I am sure he also uses opt-in lists as well.

    There is not opposing philosophies here, only two different strategies.

    Maybe you could develop a free resource to give away (no opt-in) and then your loyal readers would pass that on to generate traffic to your opt-in sites?

    Opposing philosophies, or all part of the funnel.

  4. Dianna Huff said:

    Bob,

    I happen to think David is brilliant — in much the same way I think you are brilliant.

    However, you’re trying to sell products. David is promoting ideas. He uses his own marketing as a test lab. Instead of just talking about viral marketing and how wonderful it is, he actually uses it — and to his great advantage.

    And then he tells all us how we can use it — for free. You don’t have to buy his e-books to learn how to do what he does.

    From his e-books he’s built his business as a consultant, public speaker, and best selling business book author. He rocks.

  5. Bob Bly said:

    I just now got an e-mail on virtualization wiwth HP network adapters. The e-mail allows you to download an application brief, view a demo, or both, by clicking on a link. You are required to give no information, and therefore, the effort doesn’t capture e-mail address or generate a lead.

    Dianna, Michael, this is David’s model applied to B2B marcom. I wouldn’t do it this way. Would you? I’d get name, company, e-mail, and phone number or I wouldn’t give the brief.

  6. David Meerman Scott said:

    Hey Bob,

    Thanks for the post!

    Yeah, we just have different goals. My goals are completely different than yours with this sort of marketing. My goal is to spread my ideas as far and wide as possible. Yours are to build a list. (I don’t even have an email list.)

    All my online content is totally free with no registration. And yes, I recommend to people in my speeches and seminars that everyone conside making their content totally free with no reg required.

    The number of people who download free content is many times more than people who will fill out a form. My evidence is 50 to 1 ratio. A company I know called MailerMailer says its 20 to 1.

    This blog is free with no registration, right? Why is that? Given what you say, shouldn’t you make this password protected? And to get a password you need to give an email? You don’t do that.

    I do recognize that there is value in building a list. I just think so many companies create great content (an ebook or a white paper say) and then put a gate on it and restrict the number of people who read it. It’s sad really. Yeah they build 500 people in a list, but they could have had 10,000 people exposed to their ideas.

    Another thing I’ve noticed is that bloggers are MUCH more likely to blog about a free ebook or other free content than something that requires a registration.

    Anyway, it’s fun to disagree. Thanks for that.

    David

  7. Marc Gunn said:

    Hey Bob,

    I love what you do, but I personally, I prefer David’s method. Spam is too rampant these days. So I need to Trust someone Before I give them my email address.

    I like David’s method because by giving them something, with no strings attached, they can decide for themselves whether you are a trustworthy enough to hand over their valuable email address.

    That said, several mention that David isn’t selling much except his speaking engagements. However, I’ve found that giving away stuff for free sells more stuff. People will pay whatever you give away.

    An example, Seth Godin’s book “Ideavirus”. I downloaded it, read a couple chapters, loved it so much, I bought the audio book.

    Or on a more personal level, I’ve given away millions of MP3s from my band the Brobdingnagian Bards and as a soloist. As a result, I’ve made tens of thousands of fans, built up a HUGE mailing list, and turned Celtic music into a fairly profitable independent career. That’s more than most musicians can say.

    The trouble with our method is the tracking. It is not easy to track the results. But from the number of people who contact me and say, “I downloaded…”, or from our CD sales at CD Baby when buyers comment, “I downloaded…”, I know it is helping me sell more music.

    Admittedly, I don’t think it is for everyone, but I believe it has a great potential to rocket you faster up the “charts” than not.

    Keep up the brilliant work. Slainte!

  8. Jonathan Fields said:

    Interesting middle ground – there’s a recent trend in the internet marketing world to blend both and create a two-step process.

    John Reese’s recent launch of Traffic Secrets is a perfect example. When you land on the page, he first offers a video completely free, with no registration required.

    That video both provides a lot of high value content and it upsells a second video with even more free content, but in order to view that second video, you are required to provide an e-mail.

  9. Kristi Holl said:

    Interesting discussion here! I can see where the combination system might be the best of both worlds. I, too, am more likely to download a non-registration-required product–but I frequently go back and purchase other books and e-books by the author if the freebie was helpful and actually had solid content.

  10. David Meerman Scott said:

    One more thing… I think my business model is mischaracterized a bit here.

    I AM selling things besides my speeches. Go to Amazon and find my book “The New Rules of Marketing & PR”. Check out the Amazon sales rank. This book came out in June 2007 and in almost 14 months, it has averaged a sales rank of 350 (out of ten million books Amazon sells) and has never dropped below a sales rank of 700 . The Kindle rank is even higher (number 167 now).

    As of this writing, the book has been the number one Public Relations book in the world and the number one Web marketing book in the world for more than a year. Translations rights have been sold in nineteen languages (Russian, Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese, etc. etc.) so it is a global phenomenon.

    There are tens of thousands of books on marketing. Why mine? How did I do this?

    I never paid one penny to advertise the book. I never once pitched the media. I did not build an opt-in list.

    My book is a number one worldwide bestseller because millions of people are exposed to my ideas for free with no registration required. I don’t have to coerce them to buy the book. My readers are smart enough to decide for themselves that since they liked a free ebook or a blog post or what I said on someone’s podcast, they should buy the hardcover.

    Many people, after reading the hardcover want me to speak at their event.

    My ebooks have been work millions in business.

    I absolutely recommend this strategy to anyone — B2B, B2C, rock bands (give away downloads!) churches (podcast your sermons!), nonprofits. Free stuff sells stuff.

    Cheers! David

  11. Bob Bly said:

    David, your method is fine for someone like you who wants to make money consulting, giving speeches, or writing bookstore books.

    What about someone like me or my readers who want to live what Terry Dean calls “the Internet marketing lifestyle?” That means a six-figure passive income — no travel, no clients, no meetings, no phone calls, no personal selling.

    We just send a few brief e-mails to our lists every week and make anywhere from $100,000 to $1 million in annual sales — with virtually no labor on our part.

    Your methods seem rather labor intensive. Who wants to get on a plane? We make money 24/7 online with 100% passive income. But to do that, YOU NEED TO BUILD YOUR LIST.

    P.S. While I trust you, your comment about making millions is a little suspicious because you don’t prove it anywhere. On my landing pages (e.g., http://www.theinternetmarketingretirementplan.com), I actually publish my shopping cart sales figures. So I PROVE the income claims I make. I am too wary of people throwing big numbers out there without documentation.

  12. Sandra said:

    Bob,
    I have purchased products from both of you. And I totally understand your point of view about making your income passively. That would definitely be the way to go. But I think you may be the last successful person of that generation of information product publishing. In fact I have purchased more from David than I have from you. But if you really want to break it down, it is very possible you made more profit from my purchases because you worked less hours for it.

    I do agree with Jonathan in that a new hybrid is beginning to take over in the online services/product market.

    I signed up for a free PR class. 7 lessons, 1 per day. They were emailed to me. After the 7th lesson, I received about 2 emails that resembled blog posts or newsletter articles-informative and brief. The third contact, I received the sales pitch. Think I won’t remember this marketer when it comes time to think about my marketing plan? Brilliant startegy.

  13. Dianna Huff said:

    Bob,

    Like Sandra, I have purchased products from both you and David.

    Your respective business models work for each of you as individuals. Some people actually like getting on a plane and speaking at conferences. Some people really do not want to sit at home creating new products to sell — which is actually harder than it sounds because I’ve done it.

    I’d rather give a presentation — I like giving them and find the experience of meeting people and sharing ideas to be exhilarating and fun.

    Not everyone needs or wants to put their numbers up for the world to see. The Google guys were mum for years about how much money they were making from AdWords. They didn’t want other companies to know how much money they were making because then they would try and horn in on their play. Smart thinking, I say.

  14. Bob Bly said:

    Sandra: the PR strategy of sending lessons via e-mail isn’t new at all. Tons of Internet marketers use it to sell info products (I haven’t yet, but it’s certainly on my to do list).

    Dianna: I agree: different strokes for different folks. But be warned: speaking may seem glamorous and exciting at first. But the vast majority of speakers soon tire of being on the road all the time. They increasingly look for a way to monetize their content without always being on a plane or in a hotel.

    How do they do it? Virtually all of them by packaging their expertise as information products, which they sell online using the same methods I do — the ones that Sandra (erroneously in my opinion) says are fading.

  15. David Daniels said:

    I know David and completely agree with his approach. At Launch Clinic we dropped the need for an email address for our paper and downloads increased dramatically. BUT, we now ask for an email address for our newsletter, RSS feed and webcast. Think of it like the second date. We don’t get too personal too quick. I also saw an increase in the sales of online products (toolkits) after removing the email requirement. Give something of value away for free to gain strategic advantage.

  16. David Meerman Scott said:

    Bob, I have a passive income from the sale of my books and other products. You can see my Amazon sales rank and you can see my speaking calendar on my site. But I don’t have to prove anything to anyone except my wife.

    I just love speaking and have been doing it for 20 years. I no longer do consulting (don’t have time). Maybe its an ego thing, but I really like to speak. I’ll never be a rock star, so this is as close as I’ll ever get. I even like the plane rides because I can enjoy reading a good book for a few hours with no interruptions.

    I’m happy for you because you’re doing what you want. But can’t you see that I am too?

    I’m a surfer. I just love getting into the waves. I often accept speaking gigs so I can surf and get paid very well for it. Just this year past winter I’ve been surfing (when it is frozen in Boston where I live) in Puerto Rico, San Diego, Mexico, and Florida. I have a gig coming up in Sydney, Australia next winter. During the summer months I accept fewer speaking gigs and surf a lot at Cisco Beach on Nantucket Island.

    You’re living your dream of staying at home and making money from your list. I’m living mine by traveling the world, surfing, and making money by speaking.

    It would seem that we have both built a lifestyle that works for us and we both win, don’t you think?

  17. Bob Bly said:

    David Daniels: When I clicked on your name in your comment, I got a warning that yours was a Fraudulent Site, which somewhat undermines your credibility here. If Launch Clinic seriously advocates giving away content without requiring the user to opt into the marketer’s e-list, I would be interested in hearing from other information marketers who agree with this practice. ALL of the major players in the field — Agora, Motley Fool, Weiss Research — use the model I advocate: getting the visitor to opt into our e-list before allowing him to access the free content.

    David Scott: your latest comment is proof of the old adage that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. I suspect you would not be happy doing what I do. Likewise, if I had to travel round trip to a foreign country to give a talk I do sitting at my desk over a teleconference line, I’d be miserable at the prospect of it.

  18. David Meerman Scott said:

    Yes, Bob. You’re right. If my job was just sitting at my desk, I’d go insane.

  19. David Daniels said:

    Thanks for the info Bob. Not sure why you would get a fraudulent site warning but will have someone check into that immediately. I’ve enjoyed reading the comments.

  20. AnotherBobHere said:

    Bob and Dave, I think the easiest answer to what both of you are saying is that we need to do both. I allow my users to view my most current e-newsletter and white papers without having to opt into my email list yet I also allow them to receive my e-newsletter automatically every week via email opt in. I also have special reports and monthly webinars that I ask for their contact information in detail if they want to gain access to what I consider 2nd tier level information on my web site. Of course I also have the blog which is absolutely free as well and they can subscribe to that via RSS or Email if they choose as well.

    I think you have to have something for everyone and it is surprising that if they are really interested in your information and your products that they will go and sign up for the 2nd tier of free information.

  21. Internet Marketing Archives» Blog Archive » 'Opposing Philosophies on Viral E-Book Marketing' by Bob Bly said:

    [...] Opposing Philosophies on Viral E-Book Marketing… [...]

  22. Sandra said:

    Hello Bob,
    Thanks for taking the time to respond. I understand this isn’t a new concept, but the idea of giving away a free class, and then subtly offering services really made me like this PR professional.

    I never actually said your methods are fading. The proof is in the fact that I have purchased from you, but what the above mentioned PR professional did was let me take a peek into what she is like, what value her content has, and it gave me a chance to assess how much of an expert she is – for free!

    Unless you’re a Bob Bly ;) other information marketers would have a hard time establishing that type of relationship.

  23. Bob Bly said:

    Sandra: I think I do too, but in different ways. Go to http://www.bly.com and click on Articles. There are dozens of articles you can read and download for free, without registering on my site. As David Scott points out, my blog is free and requires no registration. It seems to me that information is three tiered:

    1. Free content.
    2. Content that requires action or information in exchange.
    3. Paid content.

  24. Teresa Bohannon said:

    I actually agree with, and use both methods. Most of my downloads do require opt-in. However; I have several branded Ebooks that can be downloaded or read online for free. The Ebooks all contain a link to one or more of my websites. Hopefully, my guest will like the product they download, and curiosity will encourage them to click on my link, check out my products and bookmark my site.

    If curiosity does not work in my favor, then chances are good that they will not be interested in the products I offer for sale anyway. True, I may lose the opportunity to make a future sale, but from my experience, the non-buyers will almost always end up either canceling their subscription, or just indiscriminately hitting the spam button anyway.

    Given that scenario, I would much rather have a happy “potential” customer who remembers me fondly for a “no strings attached” gift.

  25. Jesse Hines said:

    Very interesting discussion.

    I just read a passionate defense of the “make it free online” perspective on the Desiring God blog.

    It’s primarily targeted to Christian ministries, but many of the same issues are at work here:

    “Make It Free:

    Improving Online Effectiveness by Removing All Barriers to Accessing and Sharing Content”

    http://www.desiringgod.org/ResourceLibrary/RecentlyAdded/2458_Make_it_Free/

    An excerpt:

    “If you want your message to spread as far and as wide as possible, you should go to all lengths to remove all possible friction from the process. And note that the obstacle with charging is not simply the amount you charge, but also the mere fact that users have to go through a payment process to obtain the content.”

    Granted, as evidenced from the exchange between Bob and David, different goals may necessitate different approaches.

    But that article I linked to is very intriguing and relevant to this topic.

  26. John Jantsch said:

    Bob and David

    You’re both right and you’re both wrong and this is a silly argument (although it’s had its value)

    You are both brilliant marketers and thus I know you both know in the end it’s always, always, always about the results, about achieving stated or sometime accidental objectives. So, with that in mind, there is no right or wrong way to get results, there’s only the way that does.

    Since you both have significantly different stated results and objectives it only stands to reason that there might not be one way, or certainly not the same way, to get there.

    I think we as marketing experts box ourselves, and maybe or customers, in when we profess there’s only one way – cause not only is there not, it will change anyway.

    I recall one of you, not David, publicly calling blogs a complete waste of time, and yet, here we are wasting hours writing and commenting on one. A very good one at that.

    Personally I do both, I give a ton away and I opt-in a ton, but that’s because I want it all and feel that I have no real idea what works – only that it does sometimes.

    Thanks for inviting this and maybe next week we can have a go at Obama or McBush. That should be fun too!

  27. Stan Dubin said:

    This is a very good post with superb comments and it comes at a great time for me. I have been struggling with whether to offer a portion of my marriage repair book with no strings attached or to require an email address.

    After reading the above, I decided to offer it with no strings attached BUT put the opt-in box for the newsletter right with the offer for the free download. I won’t make it mandatory but I’m sure I’ll get sign-ups there but at the same time not restrict those who would prefer NOT to give me their email address until they know me better.

    Of course, they could know me better through my blog and free articles but I needed to figure out how to promote this item very specifically.

    To further solve this, I’ll put a reasonably unobtrusive link at the bottom of every other page in the free eBook that leads people to the newsletter opt-in page.

    I am VERY interested in David Scott’s mention of a 50-1 ratio. David, can you tell us a bit more on how you came to that measurement? I’m almost finished your “New Rules” book and it’s exceptional!

  28. Mark Shaw said:

    At the end of the day, it boils down to the strategy behind why you are writing the eBook. I always advise clients before they start writing, to establish why they are writing their eBook, what are they hoping to achieve by writing the eBook, What would be a sign of success.

    There are typically 2 reasons why people may want to write an eBook or have a digital product. They either have some knowledge that they wish to sell to others, or they want to have fame and kudos and develop themselves as an authority on that subject. Each has a different strategy behind it.

    In the selling your knowledge scenario,there are typically 2 ways to handle this.It is quite common, to simply have the standard sales page with a ‘buy now’ button at the end. You are not looking to establish a mailing list.

    Or the other version, where you are looking to develop more of a life time value for a customer. You therefore typically give away a free sample of your work, which is the driver behind the opt in mailing list. In this example, you then get the chance to promote many other products and services to your customers, as well as give them more information.

    In the other scenario, where you are looking to establish yourself as an expert etc… then I would suggest that simply allowing people to download the product as easily and without any possible barriers, is probably the way to go. You want mass adoption and mass downloads of the product, as the end result that you want is more fame and kudos.

    Cheers

    Mark Shaw

  29. Mike Stelzner said:

    Hey Guys;

    I think the summary is this:

    Different documents for different purposes.

    The ungated ebook is NOT for lead generation.

    The gates white paper is NOT for viral marketing.

    David, I would like to see some good examples of business-to-business companies that are using white papers to actually “sell” products, not just ideas.

    Any good examples?

    It seems the ebooks are great for ideas.

    Mike

  30. Donna Maria said:

    Why limit yourself to one or the other? Do both. I give away some content and make others available in exchange for either money or contact information. Usually, people sign up for both. Wjy

  31. Victor Cheng said:

    Both approaches can be part of the same funnel. Free content without registration can very easily be used to “sell” free content with registration.

    Personally, I do both. One approach is for maximum reach of audience. The other is to maximize value per individual audience member.

    I have to agree with Bob that a customer / prospect list an enormous asset.

    With all due respect to David Meerman Scott, I am certain he would make more money if he added some elements of list building along with his current free, no registration, ebook approach.

    Think of it this way, if feedburner crashed one day, how would a blogger reach his or her audience? Will 100% of those readers both re-subscribing? No way… it’s always less than 100%.

    It’s for the same reason the local restaurant should build a list of its best customers. What if the place burns down and they have to relocated (happened to two restaurants in my area). A big chunk of that business just disappears.

    A relationship with a fan is not an asset. A relationship with a fan that you can contact IS a much more valuable asset… and its an asset you have some control over (e.g., doesn’t matter if feedburner crashes, goes out of business, gets shut down, gets bought by Microsoft and they start charging, etc…)

    Similarly, I’d bet Bob could very easily build his email list faster if he had a totally free viral ebook out there. I’m pretty sure Bob would know what to do with 250,000 fans coming back to his website for more after getting something for free.

    If you look at average income range of a blogger (free content only provider) and compare it to a direct response marketer in any major media – print, infomercial, direct mail, pay-per-click… you’ll find the top echelon of direct marketers have incomes/revenues in the hundreds of millions an in some cases single digit billions range.

    Bottom line: lists work extremely well when it comes to monetization. One is definitely leaving serious money on the table by not building a list.

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  33. Bob Bly said:

    Victor: I am creating a totally free, ungated ebook now. To build my list, I am featuring a strong bounce back offer to people who get the book: click on a link and get a 170-page marketing library worth $116 for free: http://www.bly.com.reports

    If David had used this technique with his free book, and 10% of the 250,000 who downloaded it took the offer, he would have built an opt-in list of 25,000 names.

    For an information marketer like me, if we assume sales of $10 per name per year, that list would be worth an extra quarter of a million dollars a year in passive income.

    David has to make a lot of speeches and ride a lot of airplanes to make that kind of money his way! Some folks I know could get along nicely on that $250,000 annual income!!

  34. The Marketing Guy Who Drives Sales said:

    You are both right.

    Some content (e-books) should be given away for free so they can take their message as far and wide as possible. This is Public Relations. (Was it Ted Nicholas who said that if you can’t sell it you probably can’t give it away, either?)

    But sometimes, direct marketing principles dictate that we collect a name and an address in order to build a list. This is Direct Marketing.

    I have always believed in giving enough content away for free (obviously you do too since you have this blog) but then to somewhat restrict premium content in order to build a list.

    The two tactics can peacefully coexist–especially when the overriding strategies are different.

  35. Global B2B Manufacturer “Frees” Content — Sees Web Traffic Soar » B2B MarCom Writer Blog said:

    [...] has been a hot topic under discussion at Bob Bly’s blog. In a July 22, 2008 post, Bly states, I advise my readers to require the user to submit his e-mail address . . . and opt [...]

  36. Using “FREE” to Build Your Small Business Brand - Intersection Consulting said:

    [...] the totally free model, but the debate rages on – for some insight on the gated argument check out “Opposing Philosophies on eBook Marketing” by well noted copywriter, Bob [...]

  37. Reuben Rail said:

    Two Quick Thoughts

    1) Have you read this study on reward vs. reciprocity w/ regards to gathering emails?

    http://su.pr/2OxQRS

    2) Have you ever tested it [your theory]?

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