The #1 challenge of writing a weekly e-newsletter

April 25th, 2017 by Bob Bly

I am a big advocate of publishing your own e-newsletter,
because it is one of the best ways to build a large opt-in e-list
… and to establish a good relationship with your subscribers.
Doing so builds trust that leads to sales.

“But where do you get ideas for all those newsletter articles
seemingly without end?” I am often asked (I have been publishing
this online newsletter continually since 2004).

If you wish to publish an e-newsletter — whether sporadically,
monthly, or weekly — all of which can work … let me share with
you my 5 favorite sources of ideas and inspiration:

1–Things I learn.

If you are an active practitioner in your field, and given the
breakneck speed with which new techniques and developments are
invented, you are learning all the time.

Many of my articles are based on things I learn doing and
observing marketing.

I don’t invent most of them. I merely study and then explain them
in my newsletter essays.

2–Things I see.

When I observe and admire a particularly clever or effective
marketing campaign, I tell you about it here — so you can learn
it and perhaps adapt it to your business.

3–Things I know.

After almost 40 years as a copywriter and marketer, I’ve seen,
read, and tested a lot of things most other marketers have not.

Many of them are evergreen, and I present these rules and tactics
here for you — hidden gems not 1 in 100 of your competitors even
know about — giving you an almost unfair advantage.

4–Rants.

When I see people repeatedly making egregious marketing mistakes,
ignoring time-tested principles, or saying things that are wrong
or stupid, I report their errors (not naming the person
responsible) so you can learn from their mistakes.

I call these “rants” because I do tend to get worked up about it.
I have a highly sensitive B.S. detector and share what it detects
with you — often in opinionated and forceful terms.

5–Recommendations.

Whether it is a new book, new guru, recognized expert, online
course, vendor, or other resource that I think you should take a
closer look at, you’ll read about it here.

I could go on, but for me, these 5 sources give me 90% of the
ideas I need to keep on writing two fresh essays every week like
clockwork.

As for frequency, start with monthly. If open rates are good and
unsubscribe rates low, test going to weekly.

If the unsubscribe rate doesn’t spike, then your subscribers like
your missives well enough to want one a week.

Since at least half of your messages should be content, and half
or fewer sales pitches, a weekly newsletter gives you at least
one opportunity to sell a product a week.

Which can substantially increase your online revenues to the
$100,000 to $200,000 a year level or more — a stream of passive
income that can make your life easier without you working too
hard to get it.

Who wouldn’t want that?

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This entry was posted on Tuesday, April 25th, 2017 at 12:41 pm and is filed under Writing, Writing and the Internet. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

2 responses about “The #1 challenge of writing a weekly e-newsletter”

  1. Ivy said:

    I remember when, in the early 1980s, the Dobbs Ferry School Board took pride in being the second lowest paying school district in Westchester. Of course, that was also a time when parents were questioning why their kids test scores didn’t compare well with those in the three surrounding communities. And there were no websites where you can buy college papers. Residents who cared about education, including people who did not have kids in the schools, started getting more involved. The election of School Board members shifted from people running on political party lines to people who had a vision for better schools. The Good Home and Schools group was founded and that provided the foundation for the formation of a PTSA. The increased attention to the quality of the programs in the schools then led to the formation of the School Foundation. This opened opportunities that would have otherwise been difficult to achieve and the Smart Lab was created, which stimulated thinking about the possibilities and eventually leading to the IB program. This has been a broad, collaborative, and inclusive effort. As much attention has been given to the kid in the middle as to the kid in need and the kid at the top. All of the different kinds of intelligence have been embraced and the goal became a simple one of helping every kid to be successful, which required a lot of complex effort and hard work. It is a remarkable story and I can think of hundreds who should feel pride in being authors to this effort as well as the water carriers who made it happen. Good news!

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